Body as Earth

Search
Close this search box.

Being Apolitical and Spiritual is a Form of Bypassing

While some may believe that staying out of politics and focusing solely on spirituality is a path to peace, this approach is a form of bypassing. What are ways we can find more praxis between spirituality and politics?

Spiritual bypassing occurs when people use spiritual beliefs or practices to avoid facing unresolved emotional issues, traumas, or social responsibilities. By choosing to be apolitical and only focus on spirituality, people unknowingly disengage from the realities of the world, including systemic injustices and social inequities.

The amplified sense of detachment encourages independent growth, which actually perpetuates the ‘separation’ that is hypocritical of the ‘oneness’ that spiritual people often preach about.

Healing, transformation, and evolution of humanity is inherently interdependent and collective. Spirituality and political awareness are not mutually exclusive; rather, they can complement each other.

True spirituality involves compassion, empathy, and a sense of inter-being with all. Grounded spirituality inherently advocates for change, and stand against injustice. By balancing spirituality with political engagement, it cultivates a deeper understanding of themselves and the world around.

How can we commit to healing when there are people in our communities still suffering?

 

Our bodies are inherently political 

It encompasses the practice and study of how power and resources are distributed, how decisions are made, and how groups or individuals compete to influence these decisions. It refers to but is not limited by; the activities, actions, and processes that concern the governance of a country, state, or community.

In a wider sensibility, politics refers to the dynamics of power and relationships in any context, including workplaces, organisations, and social groups. This includes how authority is exercised, how conflicts are resolved, and how individuals and groups advocate for their interests and values.

 

 

Personal is Political

The popularisation of the term “the personal is political” originated from the feminist movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. It was popularised by the American feminist Carol Hanisch in a 1969 essay titled “The Personal Is Political,” which was published in the anthology “Notes from the Second Year: Women’s Liberation.”

In her essay, Hanisch argued that personal experiences of women, such as domestic labor and gender-based oppression, are deeply connected to broader political and social systems. She emphasised that the personal experiences of women should not be dismissed as complex but should be examined within the context of systemic power structures.

The phrase became a rallying cry, highlighting the importance of connecting individual experiences with larger social and political issues. It helped drive awareness and action on issues such as reproductive rights, domestic violence, and gender discrimination, encouraging women to share their stories and advocate for change. Since then, the phrase has been adopted by other social justice movements to uplift the connection between individual experiences and broader systemic challenges.

 

Sacred Activism

Sacred activism is a form of social or political engagement that integrates spirituality with the pursuit of justice, compassion, and transformative change. It involves combining the values, principles, and practices of one’s spiritual or religious beliefs with activism aimed at addressing social, economic, and environmental issues.

Sacred activism views the pursuit of justice and the healing of the world as a sacred duty, and it seeks to bring about positive change through love, empathy, and collective action.

Ultimately, sacred activism seeks to create a just, equitable, and sustainable world by bridging the gap between spirituality and social action, fostering a sense of purpose and mission in the pursuit of a better world.

 

Reflection, Integration, Action

With that said, here are some guiding questions for your own self-reflection within your spiritual practice.

What are the spiritual communities that you’re a part of? How are they engaging politically, socially, economically amidst injustice?

Whom are the marginalised and vulnerable communities within your network? What are their stories? How are you inter-being with them? (Please be aware of any saviorism, and aim for listening, and supporting, rather than saving!)

What is an action of care for the earth that you can integrate as a spiritual practice?

Further Readings

Anxiety, Holistic Health, Somatic Therapy

Anxiety, Guidance & Resources, Holistic Health

Culture, Embodiment, Perspectives

Ancestry, Earth Wisdom, Guidance & Resources

Anxiety, Holistic Health, Somatic Therapy

Anxiety, Guidance & Resources, Holistic Health

Guidance & Resources

Ancestry, Earth Wisdom, Guidance & Resources

Embodiment, Guidance & Resources, Holistic Health

Embodiment, Guidance & Resources, Holistic Health

upcoming events

All events, workshops, classes, retreats and performances facilitated by Chloe Calderon Chotrani. 

no upcoming events. currently on hiatus. please subscribe newsletter for updates

Embodied Landscapes in Singapore

event concluded

Art of Holding Space: Trauma Sensitive Practices for Facilitators

event concluded

Embodied Landscapes in Singapore

event concluded

Primordial Waters: Ancestor Circle

event concluded

Biodynamic Somatic Therapy in Singapore

event concluded

Embodied Landscapes in Singapore

event concluded

Research-in-Residence: Ubah Rumah

event concluded

Oceanic Body: Rituals of Deep Time – An Embodiment Retreat

event concluded

Percussive Pulse in Manila

event concluded

Embodied Justice: Physiology of Body-Mind-Spirit

event concluded